The Rumble

Music, Media, Business and All The Silly Things In Between

Posts tagged psychology

46 notes

emergentfutures:

Why Regret Makes Buying Experiences Better than Buying Stuff
“When you buy an object, like a computer, you may experience buyer’s remorse.  That is, soon after buying it, you may regret buying that particular computer, because you could have bought another one (or something else entirely).  You are much less likely to regret buying an experience.  Think about a big concert going in on your town.  You are more likely to regret passing up the opportunity to go to the concert than you are to regret buying a ticket to go.”
Full Story: Psychology Today

emergentfutures:

Why Regret Makes Buying Experiences Better than Buying Stuff

“When you buy an object, like a computer, you may experience buyer’s remorse.  That is, soon after buying it, you may regret buying that particular computer, because you could have bought another one (or something else entirely).  You are much less likely to regret buying an experience.  Think about a big concert going in on your town.  You are more likely to regret passing up the opportunity to go to the concert than you are to regret buying a ticket to go.”

Full Story: Psychology Today

Filed under business consumption psychology marketing music industry

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Study Links Heavy Metal Music And Mental Illness

The mp3 revolution means that young people are accessing music more than ever before and it’s not uncommon for some to listen to music for seven or eight hours a day. Most young people listen to a range of music in positive ways; to block out crowds, to lift their mood or to give them energy when exercising, but young people at risk of depression are more likely to be listening to music, particularly heavy metal music, in a negative way.

And interesting article but it doesn’t really make the relationship between the two clear…. at all.

Filed under mental illness psychology music heavy metal teenagers

16 notes

Is Google Ruining Your Memory? -- Wired Science

Although we’ve been romanticizing human memory ever since Socrates, our recall is profoundly flawed… Every time we recall a memory we also remake it, subtly tweaking the neuronal details. (This is why the more we remember something, the less accurate the memory becomes.) Although we like to think of our memories as being immutable impressions, somehow separate from the act of remembering them, they aren’t. A memory is only as real as the last time you remembered it.

(Source: courtenaybird, via smalltalktumblr)

Filed under google internet tech technology memory memories psychology philosophy

136 notes



James Reynolds, from his “Last Suppers” series (2009)  Graphic designer James Reynolds staged nine photographs of actual Death Row inmates’ final meal requests on standard-issue prison trays. He looked into each prisoners’ crime, seeking insight into why they chose what they chose. I agree with Hyperallergic’s own Hrag Vartanian’s assessment of this series:
I find it rather disturbing that Reynolds aestheticized the meals so highly until they radiate an almost minimalist sheen. It is an attempt to humanize the criminal or confuse the viewer about our notions regarding good and evil? I found myself staring at each image and psychoanalyzing each prisoner, which proves to be a frustrating and futile experience.  Nine photos in this series seems to be far too little. In this case, more would be more powerful and effective as these photos — and their careful preparation — is really about voyeurism where we are being seduced by a form of food/design/crime porn.

James Reynolds, from his “Last Suppers” series (2009)

Graphic designer James Reynolds staged nine photographs of actual Death Row inmates’ final meal requests on standard-issue prison trays. He looked into each prisoners’ crime, seeking insight into why they chose what they chose. I agree with Hyperallergic’s own Hrag Vartanian’s assessment of this series:

I find it rather disturbing that Reynolds aestheticized the meals so highly until they radiate an almost minimalist sheen. It is an attempt to humanize the criminal or confuse the viewer about our notions regarding good and evil? I found myself staring at each image and psychoanalyzing each prisoner, which proves to be a frustrating and futile experience.

Nine photos in this series seems to be far too little. In this case, more would be more powerful and effective as these photos — and their careful preparation — is really about voyeurism where we are being seduced by a form of food/design/crime porn.

(via fuckyeahcarmen)

Filed under photography crime last supper art psychology

11 notes

thebroadcaster:

Daniel Kahneman: The riddle of experience vs. memory

Widely regarded as the world’s most influential living psychologist, Daniel Kahneman won the Nobel in Economics for his pioneering work in behavioral economics — exploring the irrational ways we make decisons about risk.

Using examples from vacations to colonoscopies, Nobel laureate and founder of behavioral economics Daniel Kahneman reveals how our “experiencing selves” and our “remembering selves” perceive happiness differently. This new insight has profound implications for economics, public policy — and our own self-awareness.

This was an absolutely brilliant and insightful talk into our conflicting ‘selves’ and happiness and how people are going to have to embrace the concept in economics fairly soon.

Also, on a bit of a random note, it’s good to know that experiential happiness does not keep increasing at the same rate for incomes over $60,000 (Daniel Kahneman says it is actually very flat after this rate of income in the US). Seems like an achievable goal to me!

(via copyeditor)

Filed under business daniel kahneman happiness memories psychology story ted ted talk